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Technology is Critical in Litigation - So Embrace It - Litigation News

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Litigation News


Posted on: Jun 29, 2015

By Timothy F. Deveraux, Ladendorf Law

Today’s jurors and even judges are consumers of mass media – very polished and often effectively delivered mass media. To be equally effective, litigators must be able to tell their litigation narrative in a manner that meets their audiences’ expectations. To do this, one must embrace technology in order to first gain and then retain the attention of a jury, a judge or even an insurance adjustor. A good discussion of where to begin this process can be found in How To Compete With Star Wars: Technology In Litigation by Bruce Barrickman. 

This article provides suggestions on how to use technology to capture images, videos, and other digital images and incorporate them into various software applications to create persuasive presentations that can be used at trial or mediation.

In addition to PowerPoint, other more powerful presentation software is also readily available online for surprisingly little money. One example of this is an internet-based software package called Prezi, which has sample presentations available at www.prezi.com.  These new software applications are also much easier to use and can be easily accessed from any device with wireless capabilities.

Technology is a tool that every litigator in today’s legal profession must be familiar and comfortable with, so embrace it.

This post was written by Timothy F. Deveraux of Ladendorf Law. If you would like to submit content or write an article for the Litigation Section page, please email Rachel Beachy at rbeachy@indybar.org.

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